Everyone Indicted With Donald Trump in Georgia From Rudy Giuliani to Mark Meadows

The indictment handed up by a Georgia grand jury on Monday night names 19 people, including Donald Trump, his former chief of staff, and a host of other allies.

“Trump and the other defendants charged in this indictment refused to accept that Trump lost, and they knowingly and willfully joined a conspiracy to unlawfully change the outcome of the election in favor of Trump,” the indictment stated in its introduction.

Here’s a rundown of who’s charged and what they are accused of doing.

Donald Trump

The fourth indictment for the former president in less than five months alleges Trump was part of a criminal conspiracy with his allies to alter the outcome of the 2020 election. Trump has denied any wrongdoing.

The former U.S. president is facing 13 charges, including;

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act
  • Solicitation of violation of oath by public officer
  • Conspiracy to commit forgery in the first degree
  • Conspiracy to commit false statements and writings
  • Conspiracy to commit impersonating a public officer
  • Conspiracy to commit filing false documents
  • Filing false documents
  • False statements and writings

Rudy Giuliani

Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani is charged for the first time over his role in spreading chaos in the weeks following the 2020 election—and attempting to assemble a slate of fake electoral college electors that would submit falsified paperwork to Congress declaring Trump the winner. Giuliani is charged with 13 counts—the most of any single defendant in District Attorney Fani Willis’ 98-page indictment.

Among the charges:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act
  • Solicitation of violation of oath by public officer
  • False statements and writings
  • Conspiracy to commit impersonating a public officer
  • Conspiracy to commit forgery in the first degree
  • Conspiracy to commit false statements and writings

John Eastman

Former law professor John Eastman masterminded the fringe legal theory that the U.S. Vice President could reject certified state electors—effectively giving them unilateral control over the American electoral system. In the aftermath of the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, Eastman’s memos to Trump and his legal team were dubbed as the “coup memos.” He was charged with nine counts in Monday’s indictment, including:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act
  • Solicitation of violation of oath by public officer
  • Conspiracy to commit impersonating a public officer
  • Conspiracy to commit forgery in the first degree
  • Conspiracy to commit false statements and writings
  • Conspiracy to commit filing false documents
  • Filing false documents

Mark Meadows

Mark Meadows

Former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows

Amanda Voisard/for The Washington Post via Getty

Trump’s former chief of staff, Mark Meadows, was with him nearly every day in the leadup to Jan. 6, 2021, and his communications were a central part of the Jan. 6 Committee’s investigation into the events leading up to the riot at the U.S. Capitol building. He is charged with just two counts in Georgia:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act
  • Solicitation of violation of oath by public officer

Jeffrey Clark

Jeffrey Clark

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Jeffrey Clark, former acting assistant attorney general

Michael A. McCoy/Getty

Jeffrey Clark was the assistant attorney general for the environment and natural resources division under Trump—and a key player in the scheme to overturn the results of the 2020 election. For a brief moment after he lost the election, Trump was openly considering installing Clark as his attorney general by ousting then-AG Jeffrey Rosen, who refused to acknowledge Trump’s fraudulent claims. Clark was hit with:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act
  • Criminal attempt to commit false statements and writings.

Jenna Ellis

Jenna Ellis

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Jenna Ellis, former legal adviser to former President Donald Trump

Michael M Santiago/Getty

Trump first hired attorney Jenna Ellis after seeing her media appearances. She was quickly elevated in 2020 to senior legal adviser and put on the team in charge of contesting Trump’s loss. She would often introduce herself as a “constitutional law attorney” while appearing on television—despite the fact that she does not have any academic or professional background in the field. The indictment alleges that in November and December of 2020, Ellis met with legislators in at least two states that President Joe Biden won, Arizona and Michigan. There, she laid out the Trump team’s plan to unlawfully appoint false slates of electors. For her role, Ellis was charged with:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act
  • Solicitation of violation of oath by public officer

Kenneth Chesebro

Although not as well-known as some of Trump’s higher profile aides, former Trump campaign attorney Chesebro appears to have played a critical role in the former president’s attempts to remain in power, and is believed to be one of the unindicted co-conspirators in Trump’s D.C. case brought by Special Counsel Jack Smith. A representative for Chesebro told NBC he had not been contacted by Willis’ office. His team was reviewing the indictment and would likely release a statement on Tuesday, lawyer Scott Grubman said. He faces charges of:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act
  • Conspiracy to commit impersonating a public officer
  • Conspiracy to commit forgery in the first degree
  • Conspiracy to commit false statements and writings
  • Conspiracy to commit filing false documents

Ray Stallings Smith

Ray Stallings Smith, a Georgia attorney hired by both L. Lin Wood and the Trump campaign to litigate their attempts to block the certification of the state’s final vote count, was ultimately unsuccessful in his attempts to do so. But he was still hit with 12 counts in Monday’s indictment, including:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act
  • Solicitation of violation of oath by public officer
  • False statements and writings
  • Conspiracy to commit impersonating a public officer
  • Conspiracy to commit forgery in the first degree
  • Conspiracy to commit false statements and writings
  • Conspiracy to commit filing false documents

Robert Cheeley

Cheeley is the second Georgia-based attorney facing charges for promoting Trump’s fraud claims, having earlier this year compared election fraud claims to the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. He is accused of:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act
  • Conspiracy to commit impersonating a public officer
  • Conspiracy to commit forgery in the first degree
  • Conspiracy to commit false statements and writings
  • Conspiracy to commit filing false documents
  • Solicitation of violation of oath by public officer
  • False statements and writings

Michael Roman

A Philadelphia GOP campaign operative, Roman was employed as director of Election Day operations for Trump’s 2020 campaign. According to revelations uncovered by the Jan. 6 congressional committee, Roman was allegedly responsible for doing much of the dirty work when it came to organizing the seven slates of fake Trump electors. He is charged with:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act
  • Conspiracy to commit impersonating a public officer
  • Conspiracy to commit forgery in the first degree
  • Conspiracy to commit false statements and writings
  • Conspiracy to commit filing false documents

David Shafer

The chairman of the Georgia GOP and a former long-time member of the state legislature, Shafer helped coordinate efforts between the Trump campaign and national GOP players with low-level state and local operators. He also stage-managed and participated in a spurious conclave of Trump-backing electors in an effort to hand the former president Georgia’s 16 electoral votes. For these acts, the grand jury slapped him with the following charges:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act.
  • Impersonating a public officer
  • False statements and writings
  • Criminal attempt to commit filing false documents
  • Forgery in the first degree

Shawn Thresher Still

Elected last year to represent the suburbs north of Atlanta, in 2020 Still was a state GOP operative who agreed to serve as one of Trump’s phony electors after the sitting president lost Georgia. For pretending to a power he had no right to, he’s charged with:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act.
  • Impersonating a public officer
  • Forgery in the first degree
  • False statements and writings
  • Criminal attempt to commit false statements and writings

Stephen Lee

A pastor of a church outside Chicago, Lee allegedly traveled to the home of a Fulton County election worker to try to offer her “protection” amid the post-election furor—but with the alleged intent of inducing her to falsely testify that she and her colleagues engaged in fraudulent activity around the election. The indictment recounts that he found her incommunicative, which he reportedly blamed on him being a white man. Lee is accused of:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act.
  • Criminal attempt to commit influencing witnesses
  • Conspiracy to commit solicitation of false statements and writings
  • Influencing witnesses

Harrison Floyd

The executive director of Black Voices for Trump and a short-lived Atlanta-area House candidate, Floyd was the man Lee sent in to pinch-hit in the alleged attempt to coerce the Fulton County election worker. Floyd made multiple failed attempts to contact her by phone, before calling in a substitute of his own. For his efforts, he’s charged with:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act.
  • Conspiracy to commit solicitation of false statements and writings
  • Influencing witnesses

Trevian Kutti

Trevian Kutti

A former publicist for Kanye West and R. Kelly, Kutti went from hyping entertainment industry elites to boosting Trump’s Big Lie. For allegedly assisting Lee and Floyd in the plot to lean on an election worker, Kutti faces charges of:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act.
  • Conspiracy to commit solicitation of false statement and Writings
  • Influencing witnesses

Sidney Powell

Sidney Powell

Once a federal prosecutor, Powell became infamous in the aftermath of Trump’s election defeat for pushing a conspiracy theory in court so preposterous that the vanquished president’s legal team disowned her, and Tucker Carlson slammed her on his show. Political paranoiacs and their observers already knew her at that point as the attorney for disgraced Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn. After judges swiftly junked her election-related cases, she had a falling-out with multiple characters in the extended MAGA-verse, had to walk back some of her most absurd ravings about voter fraud amid a multi-billion-dollar defamation suit, and now faces allegations of:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act.
  • Criminal attempt to commit filing false documents
  • Conspiracy to commit election fraud
  • Conspiracy to commit computer theft
  • Conspiracy to commit computer trespass
  • Conspiracy to commit computer invasion of privacy
  • Conspiracy to defraud the state

Cathleen Latham

The Daily Beast exposed how the GOP chairwoman from Georgia’s Coffee County spearheaded the effort to grant Trump-aligned election truthers unauthorized access to a local election computer system. Latham also participated in the sham electors plot. Now, she’s facing charges of:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act.
  • Impersonating a public officer
  • Forgery in the first degree
  • False statements and writings
  • Criminal attempt to commit filing false documents
  • Conspiracy to commit election fraud
  • Conspiracy to commit computer theft
  • Conspiracy to commit computer trespass
  • Conspiracy to commit computer invasion of privacy
  • Conspiracy to defraud the state

Scott Hall

An Atlanta bail bondsman, Hall was part of the team of cyber-sleuths coordinating with Shafer and Latham. The grand jury has charged him with:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act.
  • Criminal attempt to commit filing false documents
  • Conspiracy to commit election fraud
  • Conspiracy to commit computer theft
  • Conspiracy to commit computer trespass
  • Conspiracy to commit computer invasion of privacy
  • Conspiracy to defraud the state

Misty Hampton

The former Coffee County elections supervisor, Hampton assisted the same plot to access local voting systems. She had previously made a viral video pushing the myth that Dominion-made voting systems could flip people’s votes. Hampton stands accused of:

  • Violation of the Georgia RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act.
  • Criminal attempt to commit filing false documents
  • Conspiracy to commit election fraud
  • Conspiracy to commit computer theft
  • Conspiracy to commit computer trespass
  • Conspiracy to commit computer invasion of privacy
  • Conspiracy to defraud the state

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